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Abandoned Pineview Drive-In Theater

Abandoned Pineview Drive-In Theater

Since the advent of home video and the multiplex, the drive-in theater has been on the decline. Now, the transition to digital projection is threatening to end the drive-in for good, as more of the few remaining theaters are closing every year. This is the former Pineview Drive-In in Long Pine, Nebraska, where many magical memories were made. This site is just off Highway 20/7, on the county line between Rock and Brown Counties.

Pineview Drive-In Theater

We arrived to find the owner has thoroughly fenced the entire site and posted the property, so we respected the owner’s wishes and took our photos from outside the fence.

Pineview Drive-In Theater

Pineview opened in 1954 as an independently operated drive-in theater.

Pineview Drive-In Theater



Pineview Drive-In Theater

On busy nights, cashiers worked both sides of the booth.  Before the carload pricing model, your friends had to hide in the trunk until you were past this booth, lest you have to pay for every individual in the car.

Pineview Drive-In Theater

Pineview Drive-In Theater

Pineview Drive-In Theater

Pineview Drive-In Theater

The playground was always a great place to meet other kids who went to different schools. Plenty of school days romances began here under the pink and orange hues of the Nebraska sky at dusk.

Pineview Drive-In Theater

There are others who have photographed this place at various points in the recent past.  You can see those galleries here and here.

Pineview Drive-In Theater

I’ve seen a few drive-ins in my day, but I’ve never seen one that was constructed entirely from a timber framework like this.

Pineview Drive-In Theater

We photographed the remains of another drive-in, Stardust 17 in North Dakota a few years ago.

Pineview Drive-In Theater

The gravel road on the left (above) marks the county line between Rock and Brown Counties.

Below: This is where the railroad behind the drive-in used to be.  It’s now a recreation route called the old Cowboy Trail.

Pineview Drive-In Theater

Photos by Troy Larson and Terry Hinnenkamp, copyright © 2017 Sonic Tremor Media
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What Happened to the World’s Fair?

What Happened to the World’s Fair?

The World’s Fair ended, what, five, maybe six decades ago, right? If you live in America, chances are that’s what you believe. The remains of World’s Fair grounds, like the 1964 New York World’s Fair, are frequently abandoned and blighted ghost towns, used as props in Will Smith comedies, or photographed for urban exploration blogs.

1964 NY World's Fair

Above, a remnant of the 1964 New York World’s Fair.  It’s been featured in a number of Hollywood blockbusters like Men in Black and Iron Man 2. Photo from ImagineeringDisney.com

The World’s Fair origins of fairgrounds like Seattle’s Space Needle and monorail have largely been forgotten by America’s younger generation. What is a World’s Fair, anyway?

World's Fair 1939
The Ford Pavilion at the 1939 New York World’s Fair
PostcardJamestownPennaRailroadSystemAtJamestownExpo1907web
The Jamestown Expo in Norfolk, 1907.
Louisiana_Purchase_Exposition_St._Louis_1904web
World’s Fair St. Louis, 1904

buffalo-1901-electric-towerweb

The Electric Tower, centerpiece of the World’s Fair, Buffalo, 1904. The fair would become infamous as the place where President McKinley was shot by an assassin. The President died 8 days later.

Would you be surprised to know the last American World’s Fair happened in 1984 in New Orleans, and that it holds the dubious distinction of being the only expo to go broke? That was my era, and even I don’t remember it.

The truth is, The World’s Fair has continued on since the glory days, but it has carried on without the United States.  There’s an interesting documentary, “Where’s the Fair?” — winner of multiple film festivals — that explores the reasons why the United States has been absent from the World’s Fair scene and whether anything can be done to bring it back.  Check out the trailer.

Where’s The Fair? Official Trailer from Pavilion Pictures on Vimeo.  We would urge you to check out their Facebook page and follow the project.

Some former US World Fair sites:

The Centennial Exposition – Philadelphia World’s Fair 1876. Four buildings still stand from this expo.  39°59′9.8″N 75°12′22.8″W

World Cotton Centennial – New Orleans World’s Fair 1884.  Marked by scandal and corruption exactly one hundred years before another disastrous New Orleans World Fair. Today, it’s Audubon Park and Zoo.

World’s Columbian Exposition – Chicago World’s Fair 1893.  Two buildings still stand in their original locations.  41°47′24″N 87°34′48″W

Panama-Pacific International Exposition – San Francisco World’s Fair 1915.  A surprising number of buildings still exist from this fair in San Francisco.  37°48′16.8″N 122°26′48″W

Golden Gate International Exposition –  New York World’s Fair 1939. The building now home to the Queens Museum of Art is the only structure remaining.  40°44′38.5″N 73°50′39.9″W

Expo ’74 – Spokane World’s Fair, 1974.  The first environmentally-themed World Fair.  47°39′43.9″N 117°25′8.4″W

Original Content Copyright Sonic Tremor Media LLC