Browsed by
Tag: hotel

This Must Be a Route 66 Hotel, Right?

This Must Be a Route 66 Hotel, Right?

This must be a Route 66 hotel, right? A hotel borne of car culture, a lonely stop among the cacti on the most famous two lane highway through the American southwest. Right?

Read More Read More

A Brief Revival in Creede, Colorado

A Brief Revival in Creede, Colorado

Nestled among the mountains in Mineral County, about 130 miles southwest of Colorado Springs, lies Creede, a mountain town originally founded on the silver boom. The end of the boom led to a rapid decline for this picturesque little burgh in the San Juan Mountains, but a wartime need for metals in World War II led to a brief revival in Creede, Colorado.

Creede, Colorado

The first silver discovery in this area was at the Alpha mine in 1869, and Creede started to grow in the 1870s. Precious minerals were discovered in Willow Creek Canyon in 1889, and over the next two years the population of Creede boomed from 600 residents to more than 10,000. Robert Ford, the man who killed Jesse James, took up residence in Creede during the boom years, and he met his end there when Ed O’Kelley shot him dead on June 8th, 1892.

In 1893, Creede was put to sleep by the silver panic, also known as the Denver Depression of 1893. Miners and their families left in droves, and Creede teetered on ghost town status. Zinc and lead mines provided enough for the remaining residents to scratch out a living, and the local economy even got a slight bump during World War II when metals were at a premium.

It was during that time, in 1942, that renowned photographer Andreas Feininger captured these photos of Creede for the Office of Wartime Information.

Creede, Colorado

Several of Mr. Feininger’s exposures were color transparencies, giving us a rare look at 1942 Creede in full-color. Below, some zoom views.

Creede, Colorado

Creede, Colorado



Creede, Colorado

Above: A birds-eye view of Creede in 1942.

Creede, Colorado

A look at the mining operation in Creede.

Creede, Colorado

More mining photos from Creede, 1942.

Creede, Colorado

The alcohol signs are abundant in the shot above–signs for Love’s Liquors, Phillips Liquor, Weaver’s Beer Parlor, and Walter’s Beer are all present.

Creede, Colorado

Some slice of life photos from Creede.

Creede, Colorado

Creede, Colorado

Creede, Colorado

Eventually, even the WWII mining activity would fade in Creede, as the demand for metals for the war effort ended. The last mine closed in 1985.

Creede, Colorado

Today, Creede survives as a tourist town with a population of 290 residents. In 2015, YouTuber Hunter Pontious captured flyover drone footage of Creede, Colorado in 4K resolution. Watch his amazing video below.

Photos by Andreas Feininger. Drone footage by Hunter Pontious.
Original content copyright © 2016 Sonic Tremor Media

Get Notified

Join 1,107 followers.



The Final Chapter in Capa, South Dakota

The Final Chapter in Capa, South Dakota

We visited Capa in July of 2015, near the end of a four day trip to explore some abandoned places in North Dakota, Montana, Wyoming, and South Dakota. So many times, when visiting vacant, out-of-the-way places on the high plains, we find a regular, criss-cross grid of gravel roads, intersecting every mile or two, and we can easily drive right up to our desired places, but that was not the case in Capa.

Read More Read More

Fine Art Print: Cadillac Hotel

Fine Art Print: Cadillac Hotel

This must be a Route 66 hotel, right? A hotel borne of car culture, a lonely stop among the cacti on the most famous two lane highway through the American southwest. Right? Actually, it’s not. This is the Cadillac Hotel, in Cadillac, Saskatchewan, along Canada’s Red Coat Trail, the approximate 1874 path of the North-West Mounted Police on a mission to bring law and order to the Canadian west.

Fine Art Print: Cadillac Hotel

This fine art print represents the Cadillac Hotel as it appeared in July of 2016. It is available in a variety of sizes as an aluminum print, gallery wrap fine art canvas (shown above in a 20×30 size), and museum quality fine art paper. Got something else in mind? Looking for a specific print? Contact us!

Our fine art prints are made in the USA with a 2-week turnaround time. Free shipping on fine art prints! Order today!


Styles & Sizes