Browsed by
Tag: church

Last Days in Monowi, Nebraska: Population 1

Last Days in Monowi, Nebraska: Population 1

Monowi, Nebraska is a near-ghost town in Boyd County, Nebraska, about 75 miles northwest of Norfolk.

GhostsofNorthAmerica.com

We first discovered Monowi when I ran across a story from 2011 about Monowi’s status as the smallest incorporated city in the nation with a population of only one.  Reuters photographer Rick Wilking wrote a nice piece on that one resident, Elsie Eiler.

Monowi, Nebraska

We were in Monowi quite early in the morning, so we did not feel comfortable knocking on anybody’s door, but we’re told the bar/cafe is open at 9am every day.

GhostsofNorthAmerica.com

In the course of assembling our book, Churches of the High Plains, we wrote to Monowi’s sole citizen, Elsie Eiler, and she told us the last funeral service held in this church was for her father, Michael Peklapp, on March 7th, 1960.

Monowi, Nebraska

A heavy rainstorm the night before we visited in August of 2014 softened the road to this church considerably and our car left with a couple inches of mud caked in the wheel-wells. Watch the video from our trip to Monowi.

Monowi, Nebraska

monowi8

Someone is storing old tires and beekeeping stuff in the church.

Monowi, Nebraska

If you attempt to send correspondence addressed to Monowi, the computer will spit out an address for nearby Lynch, Nebraska. In a world of barcodes and auto-sorting, Monowi, Nebraska is an anomaly.

Monowi, Nebraska

Monowi, Nebraska

There are quite a number of old structures, former businesses and homes, in Monowi.

Monowi, Nebraska

Terry wondered aloud after shooting a few places whether someone else may have moved in to Monowi recently, as there appeared to be a second occupied property (not shown), but we can’t be sure.

Monowi, Nebraska

Monowi, Nebraska

Above: one of Monowi’s grain elevators. There was another one, but it’s long gone.

Monowi, Nebraska

Monowi, Nebraska

Monowi, Nebraska

Monowi, Nebraska

Barring a miraculous boom of a type we can’t foresee, these are the last days of Monowi, Nebraska.

Monowi, Nebraska

Monowi, Nebraska

Monowi, Nebraska

Photos by Troy Larson and Terry Hinnenkamp, copyright Sonic Tremor Media LLC





Passing Through Sleepy Verwood, Saskatchewan

Passing Through Sleepy Verwood, Saskatchewan

During a trip to photograph some Saskatchewan places, including Cadillac, Neidpath, and this abandoned bridge, I found myself passing through sleepy Verwood, Saskatchewan, and stopped to grab a few photos.

Read More Read More

Church on the Prairie in RM Stonehenge

Church on the Prairie in RM Stonehenge

This is Peace Lutheran Church, a church on the prairie in the Rural Municipality of Stonehenge #73, in southern Saskatchewan, about 105 kilometers southwest of Moose Jaw, and just 2 kilometers south of the farm at the site of Lakenheath, Saskatchewan.

Read More Read More

Saskatchewan’s First Consolidated School is Abandoned

Saskatchewan’s First Consolidated School is Abandoned

As I was planning a trip to photograph Saskatchewan places in July, 2016, I didn’t have plans to stop here until I found out about the former Aneroid Consolidated School. Like so many rural communities on the Great Plains of North America, Aneroid is shrinking. Young people are now going to school in nearby Ponteix, and the former consolidated school is abandoned.

Read More Read More

Almost a Ghost: Near Ghost Town Courval, Saskatchewan

Almost a Ghost: Near Ghost Town Courval, Saskatchewan

After leaving Parkbeg, Saskatchewan, the next place on my list was the former St. Joseph’s church in tiny Courval, an unincorporated hamlet about 55 kilometers southwest of Moose Jaw, on the west end of Old Wives lake in southern Saskatchewan.

Read More Read More

A Stranger in Parkbeg, Saskatchewan

A Stranger in Parkbeg, Saskatchewan

Parkbeg is about 50 kilometers west of Moose Jaw, right along an unusual stretch of the Trans Canada Highway where the two divided sides of the highway are so far apart in places that you can’t see one side from the other. I was a stranger in Parkbeg, Saskatchewan, so as I was photographing my first place, a local resident stopped her car for a quick chat.

Read More Read More

Vanishing Hamlet: Admiral, Saskatchewan

Vanishing Hamlet: Admiral, Saskatchewan

Admiral, Saskatchewan is located in Wise Creek Rural Municipality No. 77, about 195 kilometers southeast of Medicine Hat, Alberta. Until 2006, Admiral was an official village in southern Saskatchewan, but in August of that year it was reorganized into a hamlet (analogous to the dissolution of an incorporated town in the United States). It was the end result of more than eight decades of dwindling population for this quiet settlement on the prairie. As of 2006, Admiral had a reported population of 30.

Read More Read More

This Must Be a Route 66 Hotel, Right?

This Must Be a Route 66 Hotel, Right?

This must be a Route 66 hotel, right? A hotel borne of car culture, a lonely stop among the cacti on the most famous two lane highway through the American southwest. Right?

Read More Read More

The Ghostly Remains of Neidpath

The Ghostly Remains of Neidpath

Founded in 1909, Neidpath is in southern Saskatchewan, about 40 kilometers southeast of Swift Current, or 190 kilometers north of Saco, Montana. The Canadian National Railway arrived in 1924, and today, Neidpath is a relic of that simpler time when the railway was a primary means of transportation for people and goods.

Read More Read More

The Invisible Beaches of Ridgeville, Manitoba

The Invisible Beaches of Ridgeville, Manitoba

Ridgeville, Manitoba is a shrinking community in southern Manitoba, about ten miles northeast of Emerson, or sixty miles southeast of Winnipeg. The average visitor would never know it today, but about 9,000 years ago, Ridgeville was beachfront property. Glacial Lake Agassiz (one of the largest of all the glacial lakes and larger than all of the Great Lakes combined) created a successive series of beaches in the Ridgeville area as it drained. Today, the soil remains sandy, but Lake Agassiz is long gone.

Read More Read More

Canada’s First Ukrainian Orthodox Church

Canada’s First Ukrainian Orthodox Church

It took a year to gather the photos for this post, largely due to my own confusion about two churches named St. Michaels.

I stopped in Gardenton, a tiny town in southern Manitoba, just over the international border from Minnesota, because I had been photographing some places in Tolstoi, which is just a short distance away. I hadn’t done much pre-planning or research on Gardenton, but I was pleased to discover some abandoned places I could shoot.

Read More Read More

All That Remains of a Manitoba Ghost Town

All That Remains of a Manitoba Ghost Town

The divided highway which straddles this tiny country church is the only hint that a metropolitan area of more than 700,000 people lies just thirty minutes to the north. Otherwise, this serene spot on the prairie is a place out of time, a remote spot on the table-flat plains that were once the bottom of glacial Lake Agassiz.

Read More Read More

Daydreaming on Main Street in Struble, Iowa

Daydreaming on Main Street in Struble, Iowa

Struble, Iowa is in Plymouth County, about thirty miles northeast of Sioux City, and not far from another place we recently visited, the similarly-named Ruble, Iowa.

Struble, Iowa

According to the 2010 Census, Struble is a town of 78 residents, down from an all-time high of 327 in 1910. I was fooling around on Google Earth One day when I stumbled upon Struble, and we decided to visit so we could photograph the abandoned buildings in town. In April of 2016, we found ourselves daydreaming on Main Street in Struble, Iowa, photographing two old banks which stand side-by-side.

Struble, Iowa

The Bank of Struble, built in 1917, stands right next to the former Farmers Savings Bank. It’s pretty unusual for two banks to stand right next to each other. In the years we’ve been exploring little places like Struble, this is the first time we’ve ever encountered this arrangement. If someone knows the story of these two banks, we’d love to hear it in the comments below.

Struble, Iowa

This town has been the subject of some press coverage in recent years, spotlighted in 2008 by AP writer Magdalene Biesanz in a story about Struble resident David Hawkins’ massive collection of John Deere tractors, and again in 2011 in a story about Joe and Marilynn Vollmecke, dedicated public servants who gave generously of their time to keep this tiny city in good municipal shape.

Struble, Iowa

Struble, Iowa

Directly east of the Farmers Savings Bank, a new structure is going up. We were pretty happy to see it, since most of the time, they’re tearing buildings down in little communities like this, not putting them up. It seems to be a good sign for a community that reached an all-time low population of 59 in 1970.  There were a few gentlemen working on the structure next to the bank, and we would have loved to talk to them and learn a little about Struble, but they were hoisting beams into place and we were reluctant to interrupt their work.

Struble, Iowa

On the west edge of town is the amazing St. Joseph’s Catholic Church, which celebrated its centennial back in 2003.

Struble, Iowa

Struble, Iowa

The first part of the marker inscription reads: “Our Lady of Fatima statue was erected in 1958 in Memory of Barbara and James Groetken who died December 12th, 1957 in a truck-car-school bus accident south of Struble on their way to Gehlen Catholic Schools in Le Mars.”

The second part of the inscription on the marker reads: “This marker was dedicated August 10th, 2003 at the parish centennial celebration in memory of all the children of St. Joseph’s Struble and St. Mary’s Maurice who died in their youth.”

Struble, Iowa

Struble, Iowa

Photos by Troy Larson and Terry Hinnenkamp, copyright © 2016 Sonic Tremor Media

Join 673 followers.





Here’s What It Costs to Buy an Old South Dakota Church

Here’s What It Costs to Buy an Old South Dakota Church

We were out photographing some historic and abandoned places in April of 2016 and we had just decided to call it a day and head for home when we discovered this place by accident. Technically, this address is listed as Elk Point, South Dakota, but really it’s a spot along the Interstate 29, just a mile north of the Vermillion exit, about thirty miles northwest of Sioux City.

Read More Read More

Capa’s Catholic Church, Just Before the End

Capa’s Catholic Church, Just Before the End

In July of 2015, we stopped in Capa, South Dakota to get some photos of a place with only one remaining resident.  It was a beautiful place with plenty to photograph, but we discovered the former Catholic Church, which had been unused since 1940, had recently collapsed.

Recently, Iowa photographer Dick Evans contacted us and offered to send some photos he took in Capa shortly before the church collapsed, which we’ve posted below.

Read More Read More

The Final Chapter in Capa, South Dakota

The Final Chapter in Capa, South Dakota

We visited Capa in July of 2015, near the end of a four day trip to explore some abandoned places in North Dakota, Montana, Wyoming, and South Dakota. So many times, when visiting vacant, out-of-the-way places on the high plains, we find a regular, criss-cross grid of gravel roads, intersecting every mile or two, and we can easily drive right up to our desired places, but that was not the case in Capa.

Read More Read More

The Remains of Cottonwood, South Dakota

The Remains of Cottonwood, South Dakota

On Highway 14, about halfway between Wall and Philip, lies sleepy Cottonwood, South Dakota. We visited Cottonwood at the suggestion of our friend Maya Greywolf who had been momentarily captivated by these abandoned places while passing through on a roadtrip. We had little idea what to expect, but we were thrilled at the photo opportunities when we arrived.

Read More Read More

Lily, South Dakota: Population 4

Lily, South Dakota: Population 4

According to the 2010 Census, four residents remain in Lily, South Dakota, a charming little town in Day County, about 45 miles southeast of Aberdeen. It’s in lakes country and it is a beautiful drive. There are a number of fading structures in Lily (so many in fact that I didn’t even shoot them all) including a former gas station, and a church that looks like it was converted to a shop or possibly a home.

Read More Read More

Ghost Town: Silver City, Idaho

Ghost Town: Silver City, Idaho

This is a guest post from international photojournalist Jerry Nelson of JourneyAmerica.org.

The sun doesn’t set in Silver City. It pulls a curtain across the mountains as it moves.

At 6,000 feet, the ghost town sits in a bowl surrounded by 8,000 ft. mountains. The darkness settles on the western face first, then drifts across the valley floor, as though it didn’t want the day to end. Moving like a miner at the end of his shift underground, the shadow makes its way up the eastern face before merging in secrecy with the night.

Silver City, Idaho

The stars announce their presence in bursts of constellations and galaxies that can’t be seen by city dwellers. The town that thrived before Idaho became a state doesn’t have light pollution.

Silver City is one of the few mining towns that didn’t explode in flames or evaporate into 21st-century consumerism. Visiting Silver City is going back into history only to find history isn’t decades old, but rather still around us every moment.

Silver City, Idaho

I was in western Idaho shooting a couple gigs for some clients when one asked me if I wanted to see a real, genuine, old-fashioned ghost town. I couldn’t help but think, what other kind of ghost town is there if it’s not “…genuine” and “old-fashioned.”

Jumping into their beat-up jeep with the olive paint held together by brown rust spots, we moved along the road watching the animals fight for space with passing tumbleweeds. Leaving the modern world behind us, we turned left and didn’t stop until we landed in the past, 25 miles later and a 125 years ago.

Silver City once had over 20,000 people living inside its sprawling lots and acreage. Over 1000 mines honeycombed the peaks while eight saloons kept the miners thirst away and three brothels kept them happy. A general store was the entry for nourishment and provisions. Even a hospital existed.

Silver City, Idaho

Today, there are still 75 structures left. Built between the 1860s and early 1900s, today they stand vacant and solitary as though waiting for flickers of former residents to come back home.

When Silver City was relishing its zenith, the metropolis had a baker ‘s dozen of streets, seventy-five businesses, three-hundred homes and a population of about 2,500.

Some of the country’s major stage lines operated in the area and in 1874, Silver City had the first telegraph and daily newspaper in the territory. Telephones were in use by 1880 and the town was “electrified” in the 1890s.

Silver City, Idaho

If you look carefully, you can discover four distinct burial areas despite nature’s voracious struggle to reclaim them.

Being a child of the 50s and 60s, I felt as I might see Gene Autry tie up his horse at the old hotel that hasn’t changed in 100 years and maybe Tom Mix coming out of the tavern after killing his thirst — with a sarsaparilla of course. No beer or whiskey for my childhood champions.

The streets were sandy. Just as they should be in the shades of recall. The saloon doors rocked solemnly in the stiff evening gust and the church on the hilltop, Boothill, was the only building that made the evolution from cowboy movie into the 21st century.

Silver City lies 70 miles southwest of Boise in the Owyhee Mountains. Take Highway 78 out of Murphy and turn on Highway 95 near Sheaville, at the Silver City turnoff. The town is only accessible by car from about Memorial Day until the end of October. The rest of the year, a snowmobile is needed.


Author Bio:

Jerry Nelson is an American freelance-photojournalist. He turns his pen and camera on social justice issues globally. When he’s not traveling, he lives in Buenos Aires with his Argentina wife, Ale, and their cat Tommy. Contact Jerry today at jandrewnelson2@gmail.com and follow him on Twitter (@Journey_America)

All content copyright Jerry Nelson, Journey America, and Sonic Tremor Media.





Vanishing Tolstoi, Manitoba

Vanishing Tolstoi, Manitoba

Tolstoi, Manitoba is very tiny hamlet about 90 kilometers south of Winnipeg and was one of the earliest Ukrainian settlements in Western Canada. I visited Tolstoi during a trip to photograph some abandoned places in southern Manitoba, like Canada’s first Ukrainian Orthodox Church, which is just outside nearby Gardenton, and I’ve photographed a couple more places in the area, too, like the church in Union Point, and Ridgeville, Manitoba.

Read More Read More