The Lonely Streets of Miranda, South Dakota

The Lonely Streets of Miranda, South Dakota

Miranda, South Dakota is in Faulk County, about forty miles southwest of Aberdeen. The scenery on the way to Miranda was awesome; like being adrift on a sea of prairie in places, with barely a power line or telephone pole to be seen. Miranda is an unincorporated community of about a half dozen inhabited residences, and upon arrival I was pleased to discover it had a number of vacant and abandoned places to shoot.

Miranda, South Dakota

On the south end of Pine Street — the community hall is on the left, a former tavern is in the middle, and the general store is on the right. All three were vacant on the day I visited.

Miranda, South Dakota

Although it looks like a house, this is actually the former Miranda School, on Third Street.

Miranda, South Dakota

This is the former Miranda State Bank building, on the opposite side of Pine Street. It is the second structure to wear the name Miranda State Bank since 1905. After it ceased business as a bank, a resident lived in it for a time. It is empty now.

Miranda, South Dakota

Miranda’s closed Methodist Church.

Miranda, South Dakota

There was once a Chicago and North Western Railroad depot in Miranda, but it was purchased, restored and moved to a spot near Ipswich in the nineties.

Miranda, South Dakota

The Miranda general store closed for the final time in 1984.



Miranda, South Dakota

There is a Facebook page dedicated to Miranda, South Dakota.

Miranda, South Dakota

Miranda, South Dakota

We featured several South Dakota places in this area, including Zell and Brown Earth Church, in our hardcover book, Churches of the High Plains.

Miranda, South Dakota

Photos by Troy Larson, copyright Sonic Tremor Media
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11 thoughts on “The Lonely Streets of Miranda, South Dakota

  1. I sang in that church when I was an adolescent. Morning has Broken was the song. How do I remember such things?

  2. My grandparents, John and Florence Gabriel, had 3 homes in Miranda. Well, one place of residence over a garage and two houses. I was born in 1964 and until I was 14 or so I spent every summer with my grandparents. I have memories of going to the general store, the pool hall (although no one was there), the community hall, and going to worship at the Methodist church. My grandmother would always set an extra place for Walt (Cola). Wonderful memories. It was really good to see this article and all the buildings I recall still standing.

  3. The second house pictured after the general store is where my granparents–Lincoln and Eleanor Hammond– lived, right next to the church where my parents were married. I have very fond memories of my trips to Miranda.

  4. I’m Susan Forsyth Hanson’s cousin and we were so lucky that we spent much of our childhood in this wonderful town. I miss the good times we had there. We still go back there when we get the chance. Thank you for sharing these wonderful photos – that bring back great memories.

  5. I lived North of Miranda and I have so many great memories of playing softball games and going to the pool hall afterwards for a Pepsi and putting a bag of planters peanuts in it!! Good Ole Walt! I loved the general store too.

  6. I grew up on a farm about two miles North and East of Miranda. I attended all eight years of elementary school in that school house. Sadly, now Miranda is a ghost town. There is only one inhabited home on the very Southwest side of town.

  7. We have some checks made out to the Miranda Rochdale Company in 1917 and 1919. Does anyone know what that business was?

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