Crandall’s Landmark Standard Oil Station

Crandall’s Landmark Standard Oil Station

If you decide to visit Crandall, South Dakota, this much is certain — you will be treated to some awesome prairie vistas on the way to this out of the way place near the convergence of Day, Clark, and Spink Counties. Crandall is an unincorporated community with fewer than a handful of residences remaining. The former gas station is historically significant as the last Standard Oil Station in the United States to use manual gravity pumps.

Crandall, South Dakota

South Dakota Public Broadcasting says this station was first opened in 1934 by Howard Lawson. Above: The station. In the background, the old wooden grain elevator’s top has collapsed, but most of it still stands alongside the tracks.

Crandall, South Dakota

Crandall suffered a crash when State Highway 20 was diverted in 1960.

Crandall, South Dakota

The gas station ceased operating full-time in 1970, but there is a Facebook page about the “Crandall Pumps” that seems to show some social gatherings that have been held there recently.

Crandall, South Dakota

Crandall, South Dakota

These gas pumps are 1920’s era. And it wouldn’t be South Dakota without a sign pointing the way to Wall Drug.

Crandall, South Dakota

Photos by Troy Larson, copyright Sonic Tremor Media





3 thoughts on “Crandall’s Landmark Standard Oil Station

  1. When I was younger, I lived just north of Aberdeen in North Dakota ,Minnesota. Wahpeton-breackenridge. We used to all the time go to White Rock, S D because the beer age was 18. recently I heard that White Rock has been relegated as unincorporated. almost a ghost town. I don’t remember what the population was at the time. Many a good time was had in that town.

  2. It’s great to see some of the some towns in South Dakota pop up on some of your travels. Railroad history is my hobby. Crandall was served by the Minneapolis and St. Louis RR which traveled some pretty rugged terrain from Watertown SD to Aberdeen, and beyond to Leola. Crandall hill was a long tough pull and at the top there was a siding so they could “double the train. Leave half at the bottom of the hill, park the first half in the siding and then go back down for the second half. Lots of grain hauled out of that country, but the traffic was seasonal and the route too difficult. The old grade can be followed fairly easily from watertown to Aberdeen. The last operator of the line, the C&NW abandoned operations in the late 1970s, and pulled up tracks, the ties were so rotten that they didnt bother to salvage those, and when the grass isnt too tall you can still see them in many places rotting away on the prairie.
    Again, Love your sights, photos, and commentaries. I’m a huge fan.
    Steve

  3. I am the owner.Thank you for the great write up!! Hope to have a little music next year again,need to do some house and yard cleaning. The guest registration book has 4,000 visitors over 7 years we had musicians from the area to a thousand miles away. Good times!!

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